THOMAS PHILLIPS

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
SURNAME:Phillips also recorded as Philips and Phillops
FORENAMES:Thomas
BORN:c1799
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1st REGIMENT NO:110
2nd REGIMENT NO:.
ENLISTED:21 03 1820
ATTESTED:.
HEIGHT AT ENLISTMENT:.
TROOP NO:Dec 1821: Troop 8
1822: Troop 1
Jan 1824: Troop 1
Jan 1826: Troop 1
1831: Troop 1
TROOP CAPTAIN:1813: Captain William Havelock
RANK:1820-1822: Private
1824: Private
1826: Private
1831-1832: Private
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EMBARKATIONS:31 12 1821 Dunira England
DISEMBARKATIONS:16 05 1822 Dunira Bombay India
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DIED:28 09 1832 Kirkee India aged 33 years. See autopsy report below.
BURIED:28 09 1832 Kirkee India
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AUTOPSY REPORT: CASE No. 6. Chronic Dysentery, large intestines internally irregular, rugous, gangrened.
PHILLIPS, Private, 4th Light Dragoons, AEt. 31; ten years in India. Suffered from fever at Kaira. Admitted 11th June, 1830, with diarrhoea; from that period till 20th June, 1832, was thirteen different times admitted into Hospital, either with diarrhoea or chronic dysentery. After last admission became much emaciated; feet oedematous, skin sallow, occasional purging, died 28th September, 1832. During the two years and three months had been 355 days in Hospital.
Inspection, six hours after death. Abdomen contained two pounds of clear straw-coloured serum; the omentum in parts infiltrated with serum, stretched over the intestines, and had formed old adhesions to the left side of the abdominal parietes; the glands of the mesentery and meso-colon dark chocolate colour, numerous, enlarged, none however larger than a horse-bean. Neither coecum nor colon had formed adhesians: the whole large bowels contracted and thickened, had lost to a great degree their cells - they hung more loosely in the abdomen than usual, it seemed as if their natural connections had been lengthened, the serious tunic pale washy-looking. The fatty processes of the colon converted into bladdery-looking bodies containing serum. The mesenteric vessels empty, stomach small, mucous coat healthy, the small intestines for the most part somewhat contracted, with here and there distended portions with thinned coats. Jejunum contained tenacious light yellow mucous. Ileum healthy to within a few inches of its termination, where there was internally a dark red portion in part sloughy, the inner surface of the large bowels diseased throughout, irregular, a succession of elevations and depressions, the former presented a clear transparent, uncoloured mucous surface, edged round with a red line and dotted red here and there. The red line, as seen through a magnifying glass, was a succession of small defined red points. From the surface of these elevated parts there did not peel tenacious mucus, as I have generally seen. Underneath, the cellular tissue was much thickened. The depressed surface varied in colour, from dark to black, in patches of various diameter to an inch and upwards, many of them connected continuous winding amongst the elevated parts, and forming the greater extent of the inner surface. - From these patches a tender pellicle peeled easily, the darker the tint the tenderer the pellicle, in one situation it had in part separated naturally; underneath the pellicles there was a dark red or black, moist, infiltrated surface; interposed between this infiltrated part and the muscular coat there was a layer of pale condensed cellular tissue. In the rectum, no irregularity of surfacem but abraded of arterial red colour, the tint very varying in death. It was like a partially washed out colour in a water-colour drawing. - Liver small, one unnatural adhesion to the left side; when cut into, somewhat hard, much mottled, hypertrophy of the white substance, atrophy of the red. - Gall-bladder shrivelled, contained some dark-coloured concretions, spleen healthy; kidnies small lobulated. - A little serum in the chest and pericardium, lungs pale. Heart healthy.
Remarks. I have not elsewhere seen to the same extent, that dark-red, and in part black, depressed condition, which constituted so extensive a portion of the inner surface of the large bowels in this case. In No. 3 [William Nash] there were one or two small patches similar to the black ones in this case. What is the nature of the lesion? Surely not an active phlogoses ending in gangrene. May it not be more analogous to those petechial infiltrations which in certain circumstances take place in the skin? May it be, that after a time the pellicle above the extravasated patch, from being separated from its normal connections, dies and sloughs off? The irregularity of surface in this case was probably in part produced on the principle alluded to at the commencement of this paper, and more fully dwelt upon at the end of case No. 4 [John Garness]. We cannot attribute much of the elevation to the thickening of the sub-cellular tissue, because such thickening also occurred in the depressed portions; moreover, the state of integrity of the villous surface of the elevated portions, did not appear compatible with the existence of much disease.
The state of atrophy of the liver, is that condition of the organ which is generally attended with ascites. The dysentery described by me in the Edinburgh Journal, prevailed in 1830, in the 40th Regiment at Belgaum. I have in that statement, remarked that the symptoms at the commencement were often obscure, that the disease was not ushered in with purging, but frequently with a confined state of the bowels and sense of distension in the course of the colon, and that the dysenteric symptoms followed as a subsequent event. I also hinted, that probably these early symptoms depended upon the implication of the omentumm and peritoneal coat of the colon. During the same year and months there prevailed extensively, a bowel complaint in the 4th Dragoons, at Kirkee: its early symptoms however were most generally those of diarrhoea; the dysenteric symptoms appearing subsequently. No. 1 [John Knapp], No. 3 [William Nash] and No. 6 [Thomas Phillips] all suffered from that endemic, and we see from the absence of all peritoneal adhesions in their dissections, additional reason for believing, that the sense of distension, the occasional constipation in the Belhaum disease, were to be considered as related to the implication of the peritoneal coat. The two diseases were no doubt very different, that at Kirkee probably only inflammation of the mucous lining ending in softening, as in No. 1 [John Knapp], the disease extending as a subsequent occurrence to the sub-cellular tissue, No. 3 [William Nash].
In the Belgaum disease there was acute inflammation, seizing all the tunics of the large bowels throughout their great extent, ending rapidly in disorganizement by ulceration, gangrene and sloughing.
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OTHER SOURCES:Transactions of the Medical and Physical Society of Calcutta, Vol. 7, 1835
TNA SOURCES:WO/12/634-637
WO/12/641-642
BL SOURCES:IOR/N/3/10
IOR/MAR/L/B21
OTHER SOURCES:.
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4th Light Dragoons Index

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